New study finds gut microbiome could be linked to depression


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A new study of two large groups of Europeans has found that several types of intestinal bacteria are missing in people with depression, according to the journal Science.

The scientists could not say if the absence is a cause or an effect of the disease, but they could show that many intestinal bacteria could produce substances that affect the function of the nerve cells and possibly the state of mind. The results were published in the journal Nature Microbiology.

To test the link between the microbiome and depression, Jeroen Raes, a microbiologist at the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium, and his team examined 1054 Belgians to evaluate a "normal" microbiome.

Within the group, 173 people had been diagnosed with depression or had been made bad in a quality of life survey. The intestinal microbes of the depressed group were compared with the "normal" group.

Two types of bacteria, Coprococcus and Dialister, were absent from the bowels of depressed participants.

Then, the team examined the microbiomes of 1064 Dutch participants and also found that the same two species were missing in depressed people.

It is not yet clear how the gut microbiome affects the brain. A possible pathway is through the vagus nerve, which connects the intestine and the brain.

But with more studies, scientists hope that the microbial-brain connection can lead to novel therapies to treat depression.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Participants in the study of Belgium and the Netherlands.
2. Belgium participants
3. It was found that the depressed participants lacked two intestinal bacteria
4. The microbial-cerebral connection could lead to new depression treatments

VOICEOVER (in English):
"A new study of two large groups of Europeans has found that several types of intestinal bacteria are missing in people with depression."

"To test the link between the microbiome and depression, Jeroen Raes, a microbiologist at the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium, and his team looked at 1054 Belgians to evaluate a" normal "microbiome.

"Within the group, 173 people had been diagnosed with depression or had been made bad in a quality of life survey.The intestinal microbes of the depressed group were compared to the" normal "group.

"Two types of bacteria, Coprococcus and Dialister, were absent from the entrails of depressed participants."

"Then, the team examined the microbiomes of 1064 Dutch participants and also discovered that the same two species were missing in depressed people."

"But with more studies, scientists hope that the microbial-brain connection can eventually lead to new therapies to treat depression."

SOURCES: Science Magazine

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    New study finds gut microbiome could be linked to depression

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