It’s Common For An Artist To Be Depressed After Finishing Their Work – Dr. Ken Atchity


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In this video interview from Film Courage, author / producer Dr. Ken Atchity shares his thoughts on whether it is common for an artist to get depressed after finishing his work. He also touches the personalities Type A, Type B, Type C and Type P.

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Video credits to Film Courage YouTube channel





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    It’s Common For An Artist To Be Depressed After Finishing Their Work – Dr. Ken Atchity

    Comments 15

    1. yep. my parrents and sister died in a car accident half a year ago. i lost my job. maybe i'll just go for a jog to get over it. thanks Dr. Ken Atchity.

    2. I can confirm the creative postpartum depression upon completion of a project… as well as the advice to have multiple projects going at once to prevent it.

    3. Perhaps a deeper probe is that of facing apparent finite vs. infinite aspects of oneself. If ever one imputes as finite, this engages a stop/start mechanism which inadvertently cuts oneself off from imputing eternal access buoyancy of high-octane spiritual fuel—the nature of the latter being a natural well-spring of inherent intrinsic excitation. It’s immortal. The finite might be at times misapprehended as arising from the womb of the infinite. In ultimate truth, there is no finite, so it behooves us not to get caught in any opaque disillusionments of an already self-asserting faulty finite mechanism which likes to pose as eternal truth. By using negentropic breathing, depression completely dissolves. It cannot survive in that field.

    4. Omg I say to just run to get energy flowing again all the time lol. It is not possible to be depressed sprinting. Literally just walking down the block I start sprinting because its just more fun lol

    5. Wow, this was right on. I am a Software Developer and for the first time in my life, I have finished my first personal project. Yes, I was scared of finishing and always found reasons why my software wasn't good enough. I had to force myself to push thru to get it done and I can't lie, it wasn't easy.

    6. I don’t know a single artist who’s not depressed beginning, during or after a project. Artists have a suicide rate higher than any other group.

    7. My self-discovery: I feel relieved after I finish a project, but I don’t feel like celebrating it, which is ironic, because right before I finish a project, I’m like: “I’m gonna party all night long, go out with my friends, buy a huge cake and a bottle of champagne!” But in the end, I just end up sitting around feeling “ah, well that was done, but meh don’t feel like doing anything…” It’s like once it’s done, it doesn’t feel that significant anymore.

    8. Flaubert made people around him either crazy or dull. His work justified him at every level.

    9. Great video!

      As for the question, very VERY rarely. I do more than write ups, and game development for settings, world building, and villainous sons of bitches. In most of the projects I'm even a part of, the actual progression is more like a work of attrition. At first, it's an exciting idea that sounds good, and with some basic outline or sketching out, "looks good on paper". Then we go ahead and start actually building or composing this thing, and it quickly becomes apparent just how ENORMOUS this thing's going to be and just how much work is getting involved intensely.
      Through the functions of work-flow and the gestalt action of hurrying up to complete a segment only to wait for the pass around and supplies to come to further that next step, there are obviously highs and lows. At some point, there's that "home stretch" when we know our project is actually coming to fruition. We WILL have a product, something to show for it…

      Now, in games and charts and all the props I've built, the various puzzles and contraptions for illustrating or demonstrating a point or what have you, the home stretch feels GREAT! It's going to render a product to show off, and be proud of… OR it's going to complete a game or some portion of the game that wasn't playable before, and I'm excited all over again to be able to play with it…
      The few rare times I've actually been depressed (or anything resembling it) is when I'm going to finish this project for something impressive, unique, and then it's just going to go away. It's not for me to play with after the client gets it… and while I want one desperately, there's just NO justification for me getting one, or even building another without a client who wants to throw money at me for it.
      Saying "good bye" to a remarkable product, when I'd much rather really be playing with it myself… is kind of sad. SO I'll give you that…
      BUT you take a little time out for yourself, and you PLAY WITH THE DAMN THING!!! Enjoy it while you've still got it, and can… and you can always call it "quality management" because I'd rather it break here, where I can just fix the problem, or re-engineer it so it won't break in the future like that… than break on a client who can only come back and get really REALLY mad at me for building "garbage".

      …but the truth is, I make toys… AND I love to play with them, too. ;o)

    10. Hello from Russian filmmakers! I found your channel 2 months ago, and I'm so happy about it! Cause we don't have such usefull resource.. Thanks for your work! 🙂

    11. 😂😂😂 when this popped up on my phone's YouTube Notification the title cut off – so it actually read "It's Common For An Artist To Be Depressed Af."

      I was like, "depressed af?" What?

    12. I haven't been depressed after finishing a project, and I think it's because I'm always making sure I'm working on multiple projects at once. Yes, I will focus on one project at a time, but I always make sure I'm crafting an outline, jotting down ideas, or even drawing images for whatever the next major project is that I'm working on.

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